Landing On The Surface of a Comet

Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

It’s pretty astonishing that, as of a few hours ago, the European Space Agency was able to land a robot on the surface of a comet. A mission 10 years in the making, the team’s Rosetta spacecraft successfully placed the Philae lander on to the Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, which is moving at 34,400 miles per hour (that’s 45x the speed of sound). The New York Times has an incredible gallery of images (like the one above) which shows the approach of the satellite to 67P which have been blowing my mind.

I also think it’s pretty funny that the comet is shaped like a duck, sorta.

Bobby Solomon

November 12, 2014 / By

Curiosity and Eccenticity in Oskar Proctor’s Photos from Viktor Wynd’s Cabinet of Wonders

Oskar Proctor and Viktor Wynd's Cabinet of Wonders

London is getting a new museum and to call it eccentric may just be an understatement. Opening this month The Viktor Wynd Museum of Curiosities is no doubt unlike anything you’ve seen before. “I’m so bored of contemporary museums and their desperate attempt to classify and make sense of everything,” Wynd told The Guardian recently. “The world is one big, glorious mess and we should celebrate that.”

Oskar Proctor and Viktor Wynd's Cabinet of Wonders

Wynd has been building his collection for the last decade and his new Museum is not his only big release this year. He recently teamed up with the publishers at Prestel to release Viktor Wynd’s Cabinet of Wonders; a book that celebrates his collection and the collections of many more dilettantes, bohemians and artists.

Oskar Proctor and Viktor Wynd's Cabinet of Wonders

Photographed by Oskar Proctor, these images capture the curiosities and horrors found in the collections of many other eccentrics. From shrunken heads and narwhal tusks to old erotica to occult paintings, the series of images are fascinating and unique.

Oskar Proctor and Viktor Wynd's Cabinet of Wonders

The book also includes advice on how to start a collection of your own, covering everything from attending auction houses, to finding the right private dealers, flea markets and fairs. If pickled genitals, old skeletons or taxidermy animals are your thing then this book is certainty for you.

Oskar Proctor and Viktor Wynd's Cabinet of Wonders

Oskar Proctor and Viktor Wynd's Cabinet of Wonders

You can see a few more images taken by Oskar Proctor on his website. The book, Viktor Wynd’s Cabinet of Wonders, can be ordered here and Wynd’s museum will open hopefully open in Hackney later this month.

Philip Kennedy

November 12, 2014 / By

Country Fictions: Juan Aballe Photographs the True Face of a Pastoral Utopia

Country Fictions by Juan Aballe

Have you ever thought about packing it all in and moving to the countryside? If you live in a city I’m sure that at some point in life you’ve considered leaving the fumes and smog behind and heading out in-search of fresh air and clean living. Who hasn’t reminisced about some green and fertile countryside from a half-remembered youth? Wouldn’t it be nice to return there?

This is certainly a thought that the Spanish photographer Juan Aballe has had. A few years ago he noticed that many of his close friends were moving to the countryside and so Aballe found himself confronted by the thought – what would life be like if he packed it all in and headed out to the country.

Country Fictions by Juan Aballe

Country Fictions by Juan Aballe

What followed was a series of photographs titled Country Fictions. Taken between 2011 and 2013, they were shot in a number scarcely populated areas on the Iberian Peninsula. But did Aballe find the rural utopia he had imagined? Not exactly. Aballe is a photographer who is more than aware of the dreams that can be captured behind a lens. Its title not withstanding, it’s hard to tell that these photographs are in fact a fiction. They’re a vision of Aballe’s imagined utopia. Like all photography, they show a fiction played out as a fact.

Country Fictions by Juan Aballe

Country Fictions by Juan Aballe

“In what could be called a collection of daydreams, Country Fictions reflects on the photographic language itself and how we are influenced by previous representations and preconceived ideas about rural utopias” says Aballe. “The illusion of escaping from contemporary society, the naivety and the hopes built around nature come together with the strangeness and the nostalgic look at a life that is not mine.”

Country Fictions by Juan Aballe

Country Fictions by Juan Aballe

It’s a great collection of images. You can view the full set on Juan Aballe’s website.

Philip Kennedy

November 10, 2014 / By

You’ve Never Seen Anything Quite Like the Maps of Sohei Nishino

Sohei Nishino

For a number of years the Japanese artist and cartographer Sohei Nishino has been mapping the world’s cities. From Rio to London and from New York to Tokyo, his highly detailed maps serve up a unique portrait of some of the world’s most diverse cities. Consisting of thousands of cut-out snapshots of each location, the artist meticulously pieces together these images to form highly complicated collages that include everything from people and animals to buildings and streets.

Sohei Nishino

Sohei Nishino

Nishino takes literally thousands upon thousands of photos before he’s ready to begin his cartographic collage. Piece by piece he edits these images down until he’s selected just the right ones. Despite the editing, his final work can still include up to 4,000 photographs; each of these he hand prints and then cuts and collages them together to create huge compositions that reflect his personal experience of each city. It’s a remarkable process and the results really do speak for themselves.

Sohei Nishino

Sohei Nishino

For those in London, an exhibition of Nishino’s work entitled ‘New Dioramas’ runs at Michael Hoppen Contemporary until 7 January 2015.

Philip Kennedy

November 10, 2014 / By

Unique and Intriguing Portraits by James Chororos

James Chororos

Striking out and doing what you truly love is never an easy decision, though it can lead to true happiness. That’s the case with James Chororos, a New York photographer who left his position as an architect with Studio Daniel Libeskind to concentrate on photography full-time. This proved to be a smart move as evidenced by the incredibly rich work that James put online.

His finest photos can be found under his portrait section. He’s captured an incredibly diverse range of people in such interesting places, all of which draw you in and make you want to know more. I hope to see James’ work showing up in more places soon.

James Chororos

James Chororos

James Chororos

James Chororos

Bobby Solomon

October 13, 2014 / By

Pickled Thoughts Explores the Physical and Flexible Beauty of Dance

Dance Photography by Pickled Thoughts

Dance Photography by Pickled Thoughts

If you visit any professional photographer’s website you’re bound to find that their work is typically – and understandably – divided into some rather traditional categories. Most of them will have a section dedicated to ‘portraits’ for example. Others may photograph ‘Architecture’, ‘Landscapes’ or ‘Models’. If you’ve seen as many sites as I have then you’ll no doubt know how frequently these categories crop up. That’s why I was excited to see that the photographer Pickled Thoughts had one category I haven’t seen appear too often. That category is: ‘Dance’.

Dance Photography by Pickled Thoughts

While my attendance at contemporary dance shows often falls under the remit of ‘boyfriend duty’, I still can occasionally be wowed by a performance. Dance is an art-form which holds such grace, beauty and elegance, but it’s also incredibly physically demanding. It’s one of the wonderful dichotomies you witness during any performance and I feel that these photographs do a great job of demonstrating the flexibility of the dancers while never distracting from the beauty of their movements.

Dance Photography by Pickled Thoughts

Dance Photography by Pickled Thoughts

The lighting, composition and energy in this work is great and I highly recommend you check out the full series here.

Philip Kennedy

October 6, 2014 / By

David Benjamin Sherry’s Mono-Color Landscapes Are Far From Monotonous

Sherry-Danziger-1

New York’s illustrious photography gallery, Danziger, has inaugurated its new space at 521 West 23rd Street with the first NYC showing of David Benjamin Sherry’s mono-color landscapes. Featuring a series of photographs that Sherry shot over the course of 2013 and 2014, it’s a heartfelt look at the world in a post modern sense. Having turned classic American landscapes into panoramas of vast and vivid color, Sherry’s renditions reminds us the importance of color in design and how much it can influence the perception of your work. The body of work is stunning and its presentation falls inline with the recent release of Sherry’s book.

Sherry-Danziger-4

David Benjamin Sherry was born in 1981 in Woodstock, NY and currently lives and works out of Los Angeles. Having received his BFA from Rhode Island School of Design and his MFA from Yale University, he has seen much success and presented forth an impressive body of medium challenging work. I’ve heard him referred to as the modern day Ansel Adams. If that’s not saying a lot, then I don’t know what is.

Sherry-Danziger-6

You can view his art as a part of the permanent collections at the Wexner Center of the Arts, Columbus, Ohio, Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), and the Saatchi Collection, London. Sherry’s most recent success occurred just last month, where he published Earth Changes in collaboration with Mörel Books, London. The book challenges categorical photography ideologies and questions photography’s truth.

Sherry-Danziger-8

In his latest, Sherry used a traditional handmade wooden camera and shot with the beloved f/64 aperture (admired by classics like Edward Weston and the aforementioned Adams). Sherry adds his signature chromogenic hues by then altering the film in the darkroom. These exaggerated hues are simultaneously surreal, monochrome, and painterly.

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Often acidic and futuristic, they implore the viewer to question the classic landscapes and the role of nature in the world, or rather, what role we have towards nature. This work demonstrates that Sherry is not only a master of bold, sensual color, but also exploration, as seen by the West and SouthWestern American landscapes he reimagines. He portrays geological phenomena such as rock formations and sand dunes with those vivid and unexpected colors, which are a departure from their natural presentation.

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Strolling through the gallery you begin to feel a rhythm to the show, as directed by Sherry’s syncopated palettes of color. It’s a direct engagement with the viewer and an invitation to turn the mind’s eye inward. Sherry’s landscapes remind us, without preaching, of the inherent value that exists in nature—what it offers, what it represents, and ultimately, its ability to connect us to a broader experience. You can even goes as far as concluding that the tones, in combination with the landscapes, are critical of mankind’s relationship to recent climate change.

“Everybody needs beauty as well as bread, places to play in and pray in, where Nature may heal and cheer and give strength to body and soul alike… This natural beauty – hunger is made manifest … in our magnificent National Parks … Nature’s sublime wonderlands, the admiration and joy of the world.”
– John Muir

Sherry-Danziger-5

I could probably take a page from Sherry’s book and not be so preachy about our relationship with Earth, but seeing works such as the photographs on show at Danziger fill me with passion and insight that I can’t resist. It’s so refreshing to see artists such as Sherry take another look at such a classic and beloved medium, and stock it loaded with contemporary commentary. A must see.

Sherry’s work is on show till October 25th. If you’re unable to drop by, you can order his new book here.

Nick Partyka

October 1, 2014 / By

Michael Wolf Photographs The Shadows of Trees In A Film Noir Style

Michael Wolf - Paris Tree Shadows

Sometimes I forgot how beautiful simple things can be. I think that is one of the best things about art; it can really remind you of the beauty that exists in the simple things and the mundane parts of life. That’s what I love about this series by the German-born photographer Michael Wolf. Shot on the streets of Paris, the work shows little more than the shadows of trees set against the buildings of the street. Yet in his composition and his high-contrast black-and-white he manages to find something effortlessly beautiful in something so banal.

Michael Wolf - Paris Tree Shadows

Wolf’s work is frequently interested in contemporary city life. His images of modern cities often feel far less inviting than the work shown here. Through his lens buildings reach near abstraction as they dominate everything around them and themes of voyeurism, privacy and detachment are often seen throughout his practice.

Michael Wolf - Paris Tree Shadows

Wolf doesn’t offer an explanation to the meaning behind this work. Considering his previous projects one might view it as an exploration of natures challenged role within the city, or perhaps it could be seen as a study into the small traces of the natural world that remain within our busy cities. Personally I prefer to take a more romantic view of it and see it as a simple celebration of the mundane. For me, these images serve as a reminder that there exisits simple pleasures in the world and its important to take the time every-now-and-again to stop and appreciate these simple things.

Michael Wolf - Paris Tree Shadows

Michael Wolf - Paris Tree Shadows

You can see more work from Wolf on his website.

Philip Kennedy

September 10, 2014 / By

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