Noritaka Minami’s ’1972′, an inside look at the Nakagin Capsule Tower

Noritaka Minami's '1972', an inside look at the Nakagin Capsule Tower

Noritaka Minami's '1972', an inside look at the Nakagin Capsule Tower

The Nakagin Capsule Tower, designed by Kisho Kurokawa, opened in March of 1972 as an ideal for architecture, allowing for a flexible capsule based system that would change and grow over time. Unfortunately the idea never really stuck and these capsules, meant to last around 25 years, are still in use to this day. Photographer Noritaka Minami has created a photo series titled 1972 which explores the Capsule Tower, giving insight into the decaying building.

This prototype for a new lifestyle for the 21st Century ultimately proved to be an exception rather than the rule. The Nakagin Capsule Tower in fact became the last of its kind completed in the world. Furthermore, the building has never undergone the process of regeneration during the 40 years of existence. None of the original capsules have ever been replaced, even though Kurokawa intended them to sustain a lifespan of only 25 years. As the capsules accumulate patina on their shells through the passage of time, they exist as a reminder of a future imagined to be possible at that moment in Japan as well as a future that never came.

Noritaka Minami's '1972', an inside look at the Nakagin Capsule Tower

Noritaka Minami's '1972', an inside look at the Nakagin Capsule Tower

Noritaka Minami's '1972', an inside look at the Nakagin Capsule Tower

Noritaka Minami's '1972', an inside look at the Nakagin Capsule Tower

Noritaka Minami's '1972', an inside look at the Nakagin Capsule Tower

Bobby Solomon

November 13, 2013 / By

Jason Schmidt captures Takashi Murakami’s monsters (and a beautiful model) in Los Angeles

Takashi Murakami interview with Harper's Bazaar, photos by Jason Schmidt

Harper’s Bazaar published an interview with Takashi Murakami yesterday, one that involves some backstory into his new monster movie Jellyfish Eyes. The interview is fine, kind of short to be honest, but what’s really remarkable is the photo shoot that accompanies the story.

Entitled Murakami’s Monster Magic, the photos were shot by Jason Schmidt and feature model Angela Lindvall as well as Murakami’s cast of movie monsters. The series is pretty fantastic and surreal, a beautiful woman walking around with these bizarre creatures in a variety of random Los Angeles locations – wandering through In-N-Out, lounging at the pool at The Standard Hollywood, or walking through Beverly Hills.

The photos also remind me of Charlie White’s old photo series Understanding Joshua which did a nice job of mixing surreal monsters with idyllic, Hollywood-esque situations. If you’re into these photos you absolutely need to click that link.

Takashi Murakami interview with Harper's Bazaar, photos by Jason Schmidt

Takashi Murakami interview with Harper's Bazaar, photos by Jason Schmidt

Takashi Murakami interview with Harper's Bazaar, photos by Jason Schmidt

Takashi Murakami interview with Harper's Bazaar, photos by Jason Schmidt

Bobby Solomon

November 7, 2013 / By

Subtle, looping video portraits by Jean-Yves Lemoigne

Jean-Yves Lemoigne is a French photographer who’s pushing the boundaries of what photography. Using a Red EPIC Camera he’s created these intriguing photoloops which feel like an evolution of Andy Warhol’s screen tests.

Because of the expert styling and lighting these definitely feel like works of art, and the subtlety of each movement is just so that it takes a second to figure out that something is happening. It’ll be cool to see how Jean-Yves continues to evolve this sort of technique and what the practical applications would be for a technique like this.

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Bobby Solomon

November 6, 2013 / By

A Landscape on the Borders of Fiction: Robin Friend’s ‘Belly of the Whale’

Robin Friend - Belly of the Whale

Robin Friend’s Belly of the Whale is a moody and atmospheric collection of photographs. His ongoing series is shot in-and-around Dartmoor in England’s West Country and it presents a body of work that embraces exploration, chance encounters, adventure and discovery. It’s a fantastic series and Friend’s lens captures both nature and man at their most beautiful and their most raw.

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Philip Kennedy

November 6, 2013 / By

The Fox Is Black takes over The Macallan

Elliott Erwitt for Macallan

If there’s two things I love it’s good whiskey, and obviously, beautiful photography. So it’s pretty awesome that I was asked to take over the Instagram handle for The Macallan tonight at a special event celebrating the launch of the brand’s Masters of Photography series. For the fourth edition of its series, The Macallan has commissioned renowned photographer Elliott Erwitt to capture the spirit of Scotland (where Macallan is made) through a collection of 58 images; each pair with a never before released single cask whisky from The Macallan.

If you love fine whisky and photography as much as I do, follow my photographic journey on Instagram at @The_Macallan and on Twitter at @USMacallan.

(The Elliott Erwitt photograph that accompanies Cask Number 0004112. The Macallan, Easter Elchies House in Craigellachie, Moray – © Elliott ErwittMagnum Photos)

Bobby Solomon

October 24, 2013 / By

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