Triumph Bonneville “72 Mono Racer” from Loaded Gun Customs

Triumph Bonneville Cafe Racer

I don’t know much (nothing, really) about motorcycles, so I don’t post about them often, but this “72 Mono Racer” from Loaded Gun Customs is too cool looking to not write about. What I love about this bike is the heavy use of white detailing, which pairs so beautifully with the chrome. Most of the time I think of motorcycles as bad ass hogs that are grimy and tough, but the 72 Mono Racer looks like a modernist piece of design. My favorite part is the all white exhaust system, which you can see below, which really helps to unite the whole bike.

You can see read and see more over on Bike EXIF.

Triumph Bonneville Cafe Racer

Triumph Bonneville "72 Mono Racer”

Bobby Solomon

August 12, 2013 / By

Renault Twin’Z Concept Car by Ross Lovegrove

Renault Twin’Z Concept Car by Ross Lovegrove

Renault Twin’Z Concept Car by Ross Lovegrove

I tend not to post about cars very often, but when I do they’re usually pretty forward thinking and a bit out there. More cars on the road are kind of boring, though I do think we’re starting to see some interesting shapes from Nissan and Kia. Renault (who now owns a 43% in Nissan, funny enough) could also be added to that list. The vehicle above is the Renault Twin’Z concept, designed by Ross Lovegrove as a part of Renault’s Cycle of Life project.

Lovegrove, a veteran of the design industry, is known for his biologically inspired work (his work in lighting is a good example of this), creating objects that feel… natural. He’s taken this distinct style and brought it to the Twin’Z and I think it’s totally brilliant.

Continue reading this post…

Bobby Solomon

April 18, 2013 / By

Del Popolo Food Truck, A 14 Ton Wood Burning Oven On Wheels

Del Popolo Food Truck

Del Popolo Food Truck

Del Popolo Food Truck

How important is atmosphere in a restaurant? It’s pretty important for most folks, but designers and architects may pay special attention to the quality of the details: the light fixtures hanging from the ceiling, the acoustics, the type on the menu– stuff like that. So how do you evaluate design when you’re eating from a food truck?  We may get a few clues from the Del Popolo food truck. Instead of an immersive environment, we have a mobile fragment that collapses the work of an entire restaurant kitchen into the space of a rental truck.

Del Popolo Food Truck

It’s a hefty truck, though, weighting some fourteen tons as it climbs up and brakes down the hills of San Francisco. Part of the weight comes from the enormous, wood-burning oven bolted into the back of the repurposed shipping container. The oven is nicely framed by the black steel windows that unfold, opening the side of the truck to customers and the surroundings. And just like in a restaurant, the details here are telling: the wood for the oven, the black steel, and the type stuck on the window create an atmosphere around the truck even as its surroundings change.

Alex Dent

January 14, 2013 / By

Rivendell Bicycle Works Posters by Daniel Blackman

 Daniel Blackman - Rivendell Bicycle Works Posters

 Daniel Blackman - Rivendell Bicycle Works Posters

 Daniel Blackman - Rivendell Bicycle Works Posters

 Daniel Blackman - Rivendell Bicycle Works Posters

Earlier this week New York based designer Daniel Blackman relaunched his portfolio with new work and it’s looking great. One of my favorite projects that he posted was a series of posters he created for Rivendell Bicycle Works, a bike shop in Walnut Creek. The posters have two functions: To inform customers about the different styles of bikes they have as well as providing them with some sweet swag to take home if they do buy a bike.

I love these posters because of their bold imagery and their use of type. The imagery definitely does a great job of describing the bikes, like the Sam Hillborne which is a tough country bike, so of course you could venture into space and explore. I’d totally put one of these on my wall, wouldn’t you?

Bobby Solomon

December 12, 2012 / By

A Glimpse of the Future: Tesla Model X

Tesla Model X

Tesla Model X

Tesla Model X

Not satisfied with winning Motor Trend’s Car of the Year 2013, Tesla is already on the move with their next innovation. Dubbed the Model X, this is Tesla’s take on the SUV, but it’s unlike anything you’ve ever seen. Like the Model S and the Roadster before it the Model X is fully electric yet can go from 0 to 60 MPH in less than 5 seconds.

The most distinctive design feature has to be the Falcon Wing doors which are pretty remarkable. Unlike gull wing doors which simply open upward, Falcon Wings bend while they open up, allowing them to open in the most narrow of spaces. While some might view this as gimmick the doors allow occupants to step into the car, rather than climb in. It’s the extra space that it allows which make the doors valuable.

You can see a bit more of the Model X in the video below. If you’re interested it’s definitely cool to see how it actually moves and seeing how people interact with the vehicle. I’m looking forward to seeing these on the road.

Bobby Solomon

December 4, 2012 / By

Tesla Model S is Motor Trend’s Car of the Year 2013

Tesla Model S is Motor Trend's Car of the Year 2013

Roughly a month ago I wrote a piece about the Tesla Model S and how amazing it was. Turns out I wasn’t alone in thinking that way as Motor Trend has named the Tesla Model S their car of the year for 2013.

Wait. No mention of the astonishing inflection point the Model S represents — that this is the first COTY winner in the 64-year history of the award not powered by an internal combustion engine? Sure, the Tesla’s electric powertrain delivers the driving characteristics and packaging solutions that make the Model S stand out against many of its internal combustion engine peers. But it’s only a part of the story. At its core, the Tesla Model S is simply a damned good car you happen to plug in to refuel.

What makes me happy is that clearly progress is winning. We’re talking about a $50k electric vehicle made by a company which is essentially a start-up in the auto industry outdoing all of the old dinosaurs. It’s exactly what the aut industry needs, a swift kick in the nuts. How the old dinosaurs deal with this sort of information is what will decide if they sink or swim. Hopefully the auto industry isn’t so archaic that it can’t learn to make some smart choices. Here’s to cars that make sense in our modern world!

Bobby Solomon

November 14, 2012 / By

Tesla on the forefront of electric vehicle design

Tesla Sedan

The other night I was complaining about the price of gas (it’s gone up nearly 80 cents in a matter of days here in Los Angeles) but also about the lack of vehicles that run on alternative vehicles. The automobile hasn’t evolved as nearly as much as it should have. Could you imagine waiting 100+ years for the iPhone to improve? The only real jump forward in the last 20 years was in 1997 when Toyota released the Prius, the first hybrid electric vehicle.

In 2003 though there was the emergence of Tesla Motors, a car company designing high-end vehicles that run on a lithium ion battery. Bradley Berman recently did a story for New York Times profiling the new Model S, a Sedan that adds to their line-up. The story confirms that Tesla is making the cars of the future now, we can only hope other manufacturers can catch up quickly.

The Bauhaus-stark interior is dominated by a 17-inch touch screen — imagine a jumbo iPad embedded in the dashboard — giving digital control of nearly every automotive function. The interface is brilliant, but potentially spellbinding. Lighting, climate and music selection are intuitive. It let me do things as diverse as raising the chassis when pulling into my uneven driveway to switching the steering feel from comfortable to sporty.

There’s a high-definition backup camera, and full Web browsing is available — even when the car is in motion, a capability that safety regulators may one day frown upon. A Google-style search on the navigation screen, for addresses or a keyword, pulls up results that can be directly converted into turn-by-turn guidance. It is an ingenious improvement in automotive navigation.

Another innovation is Tesla’s ability to wirelessly push new features or software updates to cars already on the road. For instance, Tesla said it would soon be downloading a change on how much or how little the car creeps forward from a standstill.

Of course a vehicle like this comes at a price. The base model starts at $49,900 and can get to over $100k. The technology and features that the Model S have go above and beyond what most cars do, and the limited run (only 3,000 will be made) don’t help either. I hope that one day we’ll see more indie car companies pop up and start filling in the gaps in the market. The automotive industry needs some innovation desperately, and Tesla is only the first step.

To get more information on Tesla click here.

Bobby Solomon

October 12, 2012 / By

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