‘The Portrait of Dorian Gray’ Distilled To 2 Minutes of Video

Penny Dreadful Portraits - The Portrait of Dorian Gray

As a part of a promotion for the new show Penny Dreadfuls director Gergely Wootsch was asked to create a series of shorts that tell classic stories in only a couple of minutes. Working alongside animators and designers Iria Lopez, Luiz Stockler, and Joe Sparkes they’ve created a moody re-telling that’s explained by writer and historian Matthew Sweet. I love that the short employs a mixture of illustration and collage, and the subtle usage of color really makes the re-telling that much stronger.

They also did versions of Dracula and Frankenstein which are equally lovely.

Penny Dreadful Portraits - The Portrait of Dorian Gray

Penny Dreadful Portraits - The Portrait of Dorian Gray

Bobby Solomon

July 17, 2014 / By

Copenhagen by Vifa: A Bluetooth Speaker With A Warm, Nordic Design

Copenhagen Speaker by Vifa

The world of bluetooth music accessories continues to expand, with stand-outs like Jambox and Nixon to up-and-comers like Lowdi. Entering from a design minded angle is the Copenhagen speaker from Vifa, pairing high-tech know-how with classic Nordic design.

The speaker was designed by Henrik Mathiassen in cooperation with Vifa to those who “values exclusive design just as much as authentic sound.” Each Copenhagen also features a special-woven textile by Kvadrat that lines the front which makes them feel warmer and more human. The combination of fabric and aluminum definitely sets it apart from other speakers like it.

No word on a release date yet but hopefully we see them out in the wild soon.

Copenhagen Speaker by Vifa

Copenhagen Speaker by Vifa

Copenhagen Speaker by Vifa

Copenhagen Speaker by Vifa

Bobby Solomon

July 16, 2014 / By

Sari Cohen Invites You to View Her Machine Dreams

Sari Cohen - La Culture

Over the week I discovered the work of Sari Cohen; an illustrator and print-maker from Tel Aviv. I love the colors in her work and I really like the shapes and forms that she uses. The work here was created for an exhibition called La Culture which ran in Tel Aviv at the end of May.

Sari Cohen - La Culture

The exhibition was part of a whole festival of illustration which took place in the city for ten days. It was Israel’s first ever Illustration Week and it sounded like they hosted a great series of events. I’ve never heard of a city putting on an illustration week before, and this one in Tel Aviv seems to have really done it well; putting together work from some of the country’s top illustrators as well as hosting dozens of exhibitions, workshops and opportunities for local illustrators and the general public to meet up.

Sari Cohen - La Culture

Sari’s illustration was selected as one of the images to promote the week and I think it’s a wonderful image to pick. Called Machine Dreams, the image is a fantastic piece of work celebrating imagination with surrealism and beautiful dream-like moments. Prints are currently available to purchase here, or perhaps even better is the possibility to buy the image on a dream journal which comes with a rather nifty LED pen hidden inside.

More illustrations from Sari can be viewed on her website.

Philip Kennedy

July 16, 2014 / By

The Upon Teapot by Nikolo Kerimov

The UPON Teapot by Nikolo Kerimov

Mimesis in design is something we do often. We take the parts of nature that work really well and apply it to the things we make, like this teapot by Nikolo Kermiov. Simple in form and material, the Upon Teapot draws it’s inspiration from rain falling on a mountain top.

The Upon Teapot by Nikolo Kerimov

The main idea behind Upon-tea pot was to make/transform preparing and serving tea primarily to a visual experience. Inspiration was also sought from the origins of tea – the mountain landscapes where clouds almost seem like made of tea/rain tea. Upon also beautifully refracts light between the three different materials.

Honestly, this looks like the fanciest bong ever but I have to give Nokolo props for something so simple. I appreciate that he’s only using glass, cork, and ceramic, and that all of the pieces work together so poetically. For now this is only a prototype but it sounds like there are plans to try to get it into production. You know this would look really sexy sitting on your kitchen counter.

The UPON Teapot by Nikolo Kerimov

The UPON Teapot by Nikolo Kerimov

Bobby Solomon

July 15, 2014 / By

Yvan Duque Illustrates A Series of Mysterious Islands

Yvan Duque Illustrates A Series of Mysterious Islands

Yvan Duque is a French illustrator who studied at the Pivaut Art school in Nantes. His style incorporates a lot of landscapes and natural elements, as evidenced by this wonderful series of island illustrations he created for a personal project.

I love the muted colors paired with the pops of green from the trees that sprinkle the islands. The subtle watercolor paper texture in the backgrounds of each is a nice touch as well. There’s a nice mix of flat and textured overall that gives each piece a lot of character. You can see more of of Yvan’s work by checking out his portfolio.

Yvan Duque Illustrates A Series of Mysterious Islands

Yvan Duque Illustrates A Series of Mysterious Islands

Yvan Duque Illustrates A Series of Mysterious Islands

Yvan Duque

Bobby Solomon

July 15, 2014 / By

Tom Blachford’s Tranquil Aerial Photos of the Ocean

Aerial Photos by Tom Blachford

Summer is in full swing here in the northern hemisphere and Melbourne based photographer Tom Blachford has captured the spirit perfectly. These aerial photos were taken earlier this year while Melbourne was having their summer. The shots show a tranquil vision of the sea, made of dark water that’s pierced only by boats and the occasional wake. There’s something nice about the contrast of these photos and the subtle blues and greens of the ocean. You don’t often see the ocean like this which is a shame, it’s quite beautiful

You can see more of Tom’s photos by clicking here.

Aerial Photos by Tom Blachford

Aerial Photos by Tom Blachford

Aerial Photos by Tom Blachford

Aerial Photos by Tom Blachford

Aerial Photos by Tom Blachford

Aerial Photos by Tom Blachford

Bobby Solomon

July 15, 2014 / By

Turning To The Ocean For Our Next Big Food Source

Golden Kelp

As our climate starts to change so to must our eating habits. We’re currently faced with challenges like antibiotic resistance, drought, food insecurity, and obesity, so where can we turn? Funny enough, it’s the ocean, and this Scientific American article raises a lot of interesting ideas.

“I’m growing more food in 20 acres of ocean now than I was in 100 acres a few years ago,” he said. Oyster cages mark the sea floor, and curtains of kelp sprout along lines suspended by surface buoys. Mesh containers housing scallops, clams and mussels hang among the long kelp leaves. All of these species extract nutrients that leech into the water from land-based agricultural runoff (a significant contributor to ocean dead zones), and that’s central to Smith’s approach. His work with Greenwave is aimed at jump-starting a “blue-green” economy: identifying restorative species in any given ecosystem that make the oceans healthier, that are nutritious, delicious, and economically viable. This is an “elegant solution,” to some of the problems inherent in our current food system, Smith said.

The article focuses particularly on kelp which it dubs as the next “super-food”. What kind of foods do you make with kelp? There’s a surprising number of dishes though the most enticing for me personally is the kelp butter.

Kelp leaves cut into strips make a perfect al dente noodle; pickled kelp stems are crisp, flavorful and refreshing; kelp butter makes a unique but mild and rich spread; and a simple plate of kelp with a bit of sweet sesame dressing gives any fancy kale salad a run for its money.

Bobby Solomon

July 14, 2014 / By

Profile and Interview with Issey Miyake

Profile and Interview with Issey Miyake

The Financial Times’ How To Spend It section has an in-depth interview/profile on designer of all things Issey Miyake, highlighting his current projects, the variety of his projects, speaking to his peers, his work process, and his own inspirations. The man is 76 so it makes sense that he’s done so much, but the paragraph below is a perfect example of just how much he’s actually working on with his team.

The hub of Miyake’s empire is the Reality Lab department at the Miyake Design Studio. This is where his small team – including textile engineer Manabu Kikuchi, pattern engineer Sachiko Yamamoto and employees who have been working with him since before the Issey Miyake brand launched in 1971 – articulate designs for the 132 5. collection that often have their basis in complex computer-generated 3D shapes by Jun Mitani, associate professor at the Department of Computer Science, Tsukuba University. 132 5. is one part origami, two parts advanced mathematics; the result includes the new Grid cardigan (£645) and skirt (£425) with triangular panels of grey, blue and green. For the 132 5. spring collection, dynamic helix shapes, originally developed by scientists for solar panels orbiting the earth, have been reworked into flat patterns and garments. The process is both difficult and extraordinary – two things that clearly excite Miyake, for whom the journey of creation is as stimulating as the end result.

I wanna’ be like Miyake.

Bobby Solomon

July 14, 2014 / By

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