Olafur Eliasson Recontextualizes J.M.W. Turner’s Classical Landscape Paintings

Olafur Elliason Re-Contextualizes J.M.W. Turner's Classical Landscape Paintings

Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Elliasson is well-known for his work in sculptures and large-scale installations, often utilizing light or other natural elements. Recently though he’s been heading into new territory, recontextualizing the paintings of landscape artist J.M.W. Turner into circular paintings, bringing the works to a pure form.

Turner’s ability to shape and frame light in his paintings has had a significant impact on my work….In the Turner colour experiments, I’ve isolated light and colour in Turner’s works in order to extract his sense of ephemera from the objects of desire that his paintings have become. The schematic arrays of colours on round canvases generate a feeling of endlessness and allow the viewer to take in the artwork in a decentralised, meandering way.

It’s an interesting idea from a conceptual standpoint, that he’s transformed the light and colors that J.M.W. Turner saw into a sweeping, endless gradient. The abstraction while seemingly simple is intensely scientific. Eliasson is analysing pigments, paint production and application of colour in order to mix paint in the exact color for each nanometre of the visible light spectrum. An ambitious project with really impactful results.

Olafur Elliason Re-Contextualizes J.M.W. Turner's Classical Landscape Paintings

Olafur Elliason Re-Contextualizes J.M.W. Turner's Classical Landscape Paintings

Olafur Elliason Re-Contextualizes J.M.W. Turner's Classical Landscape Paintings

Bobby Solomon

September 16, 2014 / By

Check Out Nicholas Hanna’s Incredible Bubble Devices

Nicholas Hanna

Artist Nicholas Hanna seems to have a real curiosity for life. He holds a Master of Architecture degree from Yale and an MFA in Media Arts from UCLA. A native of Canada, his work investigates the sensation of wonder and the essential relationship between humans and technology.

Nicholas Hanna

I love his Bubble Devices. These mechanical installations are almost as wide as a room and they create giant bubbles. They’re the sort of things that need to be seen to be believed so fortunately Hanna has shared some videos online:

Driven by a computer, Hanna’s automatic bubble wand is a fantastic construction and the lighting in the video really captures the beauty of these incredibly large bubbles.

You can see more projects from Nicholas Hanna on his website.

Philip Kennedy

September 16, 2014 / By

Sponsored – A’ Design Awards & Competition – Call for Entries

Sponsored – A’ Design Awards & Competition – Call for Entries

A’ Design Awards is a premier annual juried design competition that honors the best designers, architects, engineers, design studios and design-oriented companies worldwide to provide them publicity, fame, and recognition. Every year, projects that focus on innovation, technology, design, and creativity are awarded with the A’ Award.

Entries to the A’ Design Award & Competition are peer-reviewed and anonymously voted by an expert 50-person jury panel consisting of scholars, design professionals and media members. There are over 100 different categories with different evaluation criteria to enter your works.

The A’ Design Prize, given to award winners, includes PR, publicity and marketing services in addition to an exclusive invitation to the glamorous Gala-Night and Award Ceremony in Italy where award winners are presented their exclusive trophies, hardcover yearbook of best designs and certificates.

A’ Design Award winner projects will be exhibited in three countries in 2015, a tour ending with Dublin, Ireland to celebrate Dublin’s 2015 World Design Hub designation.

Submit your work at adesignaward.com/registration

Deadline for entries to the A’ Design Award & Competition is on September 30, 2014. Results will be announced on April 15, 2015.

Bobby Solomon

September 15, 2014 / By

Watch An Entire Year of the Sky in Less Than Five Minutes

A History of the Sky

One of my favorite films this year has been Boyhood. Shot over a period of 12 years, it tells the story of Mason as his life unfolds during a period between the ages of 6 and 18. Before seeing the film I imagined that it must be a wonderful spectacle; that there must be something incredible about watching a person literally come-of-age on screen. In actuality, there is no real spectacle to Boyhood. If anything, that’s the real strength of the film. Real life is made up of small fleeting moments, and Boyhood captures these in a beautifully uncinematic way. In doing so, it captures something even greater than spectacle and in its subtly it reveals something more profound.

All of this is little more than preamble to introduce Ken Murphy’s “A History of the Sky”. This project is similar to Boyhood in that its premise seems suitably epic yet its lasting impression feels more poetic than astounding. A time-lapse film shot over the period of one year, Murphy reduces the ever changing skies of San Francisco into a mere 5 minute film.

“A History of the Sky enables the viewer to appreciate the rhythms of weather, the lengthening and shortening of days, and other atmospheric events on an immediate aesthetic level: the clouds, fog, wind, and rain form a rich visual texture, and sunrises and sunsets cascade across the screen.” says the self-described programmer, artist, and tinkerer. I think it’s wonderful!

Philip Kennedy

September 15, 2014 / By

James Murphy Teams Up With IBM To Turn Data About Tennis Into Music

James Murphy Teams Up With IBM To Turn Tennis Data Into Music

Finding the intersections between music, technology, and design are often challenging but when it’s done well it can certainly open up new worlds. A perfect example of this is the partnership between James Murphy, of LCD Soundsystem fame, and technologies company IBM who together creating “music” from tennis data supplied by the US Open. The video below does a good job of explaining how they code works and how they created an interface that was familiar to Murphy.

The outcome is quite unique, especially something on this scale. You can visit IBM’s Soundcloud page to get a taste of all the music that’s been created so far based on the data and it’s pretty staggering. It’s like an endless mix of chiptune tracks endlessly looping into one another. This Round of 16 collection is a perfect example as it runs almost 7 hours in total length, non-stop, back-to-back.

Adding to the experience is the fantastic artworks created for round by New York based artist and illustrator Karan Singh. I had been thinking about featuring Singh on the site recently though this seemed like the perfect opportunity to do so. His work is this mish-mash of hyper-saturated, flat colors which create the illusion of 3D shapes. I imagine this had to be a pretty fun yet exhausting project to work on. I’ve selected some of my favorite images below to give you a sense of the variety he’s created.

James Murphy Teams Up With IBM To Turn Tennis Data Into Music

James Murphy Teams Up With IBM To Turn Data About Tennis Into Music

James Murphy Teams Up With IBM To Turn Data About Tennis Into Music

James Murphy Teams Up With IBM To Turn Data About Tennis Into Music

James Murphy Teams Up With IBM To Turn Data About Tennis Into Music

You can also see more of Karan’s pieces over on his Behance page.

Bobby Solomon

September 15, 2014 / By

Joseph Perry’s ‘Every Cloud’ Print Artfully Displays The Varying Types of Clouds

'Every Cloud' Print by Joseph Perry

'Every Cloud' Print by Joseph Perry

The last time we checked in with British designer Joseph Perry he was artfully reorganizing the periodic table, artfully recreating it into something less functional but certainly more aesthetically pleasing. Now he’s back with a new silkscreened print which can turn even you into a novice meteorologist.

Every Cloud celebrates the scientific work of Luke Howard, the amateur meteorologist who brought order to the ever-changing skies. In his book ‘The Modifications of Clouds’ (1803) Howard harnessed the unpredictable beauty of the clouds, classifying them using a Latin naming structure.

I love that he chose to screen the white on to the electrically colored indigo paper which provides such a lovely contrast. These are limited to 100 so be sure to snag one while they last.

Bobby Solomon

September 15, 2014 / By

Yayoi Kusama, Still Delightfully Spotty After 85 Years

Yayoi Kusama

I was first introduced to Japanese painter Yayoi Kusama thanks to the 2007 documentary Marc Jacobs Louis Vuitton, a film which I found to be hugely inspirational and I can’t recommend enough. Since the 60s she’s been spreading her spots everywhere and applying them to literally everything: from canvas to sculptures, on fashionable bags and as a part of sprawling museum installations. Recently she spoke with Sophie Knight for The Telegraph about her life, her inspirations, and the source of her talent (kind of).

Kusama says that all her inspiration comes from within her mind, with no conscious thought, or influence from other artists, most of whom she dismisses (“Picasso painted thousands of pictures in one style, whereas my art covers every kind of idea,” she boasted once.)

“A lot of artists have to draw first with pencil, but I paint directly. Many people ask me, ‘How do you draw that?’ and I just say, ‘Ask my hand!’” she says.

It’s a great piece and a great reminder that no matter what we as creatives have a responsibility to keep on making. If she can get up at 3am and make all day long so can you.

Bobby Solomon

September 15, 2014 / By

Michael Wolf Photographs The Shadows of Trees In A Film Noir Style

Michael Wolf - Paris Tree Shadows

Sometimes I forgot how beautiful simple things can be. I think that is one of the best things about art; it can really remind you of the beauty that exists in the simple things and the mundane parts of life. That’s what I love about this series by the German-born photographer Michael Wolf. Shot on the streets of Paris, the work shows little more than the shadows of trees set against the buildings of the street. Yet in his composition and his high-contrast black-and-white he manages to find something effortlessly beautiful in something so banal.

Michael Wolf - Paris Tree Shadows

Wolf’s work is frequently interested in contemporary city life. His images of modern cities often feel far less inviting than the work shown here. Through his lens buildings reach near abstraction as they dominate everything around them and themes of voyeurism, privacy and detachment are often seen throughout his practice.

Michael Wolf - Paris Tree Shadows

Wolf doesn’t offer an explanation to the meaning behind this work. Considering his previous projects one might view it as an exploration of natures challenged role within the city, or perhaps it could be seen as a study into the small traces of the natural world that remain within our busy cities. Personally I prefer to take a more romantic view of it and see it as a simple celebration of the mundane. For me, these images serve as a reminder that there exisits simple pleasures in the world and its important to take the time every-now-and-again to stop and appreciate these simple things.

Michael Wolf - Paris Tree Shadows

Michael Wolf - Paris Tree Shadows

You can see more work from Wolf on his website.

Philip Kennedy

September 10, 2014 / By

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