Atmospheric Landscapes by Artist Peter Eastman

Peter Eastman

The South African artist Peter Eastman has been living and working in Cape Town for a number of years. While working primarily as a painter, it is Eastman’s prints that I find the most appealing. Produced digitally, Eastman creates these by working over photographs. He subtly alters forms, tones and colors and he views this process as an opportunity to explore color.

Peter Eastman

Peter Eastman

As a painter, Eastman’s work is typically monochromatic, so these images are quite distinct from what he normally creates. I find his use of color very interesting and each image has a unique atmosphere and mood to it. Despite being created digitally, I feel that there still remains quite a painterly quality to how these images are rendered and I love the way he captures light.

Peter Eastman

Peter Eastman

Peter Eastman

More work from Eastman can be viewed on his website.

Philip Kennedy

August 28, 2014 / By

High Contrast, High Impact Photography by Kilian Schönberger

Kilian Schönberger

One of the founding principles of art is understanding the balance of light and dark and how the two define shape. Once you fully understand these primary elements making art becomes easier… especially if you happen to be color blind. This the case with Kilian Schönberger, a German photographer who is both color blind and has a fantastic grasp of contrast.

Kilian Schönberger

Kilian Schönberger

Kilian Schönberger

Kilian Schönberger

Kilian Schönberger

Kilian’s type of photography is exactly the kind of photography I love most. The dramatic shifts between black and white make for such impressive photos. His choice of scenery doesn’t hurt either, whether it’s a leafless stretch of fogged out trees or a spooky Bavarian church. You’re drawn because of their dynamic lighting and textures. The lack of color doesn’t detract one bit.

Bobby Solomon

August 27, 2014 / By

Fluid, Abstract Characters and Scenarios by Mark Gmehling

Mark Gmehling

German artist Mark Gmehling has an elastic view on life. He makes fine art prints from 3D renderings of abstract characters and bizarre scenarios, all illustrated in a playfully fluid manner. It’s interesting to see 3D modeling being presented as fine art which you don’t see very often. The aesthetics of each of his figures are highly polished though and resemble beautiful, glossy ceramic pieces.

These pieces in particular are from a show that opened last Thursday called Plastic Relations, which is on view at the RWE Foyer in Dortmund, Germany. I wish I could see the images up close and pick Mark’s brain on how he makes these.

Mark Gmehling

Mark Gmehling

Mark Gmehling

Mark Gmehling

Mark Gmehling

Bobby Solomon

August 27, 2014 / By

The Desktop Wallpaper Project featuring Eric Hurtgen

The Desktop Wallpaper Project featuring Eric Hurtgen

Eric Hurtgen

Charlotte based artist and designer Eric Hurtgen creates work that utilizes detail and nuance at it’s core. Abstract imagery is distorted and manipulated to create fascinating pieces which require time to truly appreciate. This week he’s shared a wallpaper with us that bends my mind.

This piece is part of a bigger series I’ve been working on that blurs the line between photography, sculpture and digital art. I’m drawn to the effects of light on surfaces and playing with the perception of those surfaces as I layer images and reflections of images on top of each other. I have quite a few influences from a variety of artists and photographers and designers, but when I think about the main ones I’d say photographers Robert Adams and Henriette Grindat; the artist Gabriel Orozco and the designers Barbara Worjisch and Vaughn Oliver.

Bobby Solomon

August 27, 2014 / By

Elizabeth II, A Beautiful Home in Amagansett by Bates + Masi Architects

Elizabeth II by Bates Masi Architects

Architectural firm Bates Masi + Architects LCC have had roots in New York City and the East End of Long Island for over 50 years. Recently they completed this stunning family home in Amagansett, New York. If anyone knows the area, they’ll know that it’s a popular destination with tourists and features a bustling resort town as well as a number of celebrity homes.

Elizabeth II by Bates Masi Architects

One of the key considerations for this property was to shelter it from the noises of the near-by village. The architects say that their interest in the building’s acoustics was what drove the form, materials and detail of the house. From the outside, it initially looks windowless, with large concrete walls that are nearly 20″ thick. These provide excellent insulation as well as great protection from the sounds of the village.

Elizabeth II by Bates Masi Architects

Inside the home looks bright and spacious with a particularly beautiful living-and-dining space. Its use of different woods makes this area feel relaxing and comforting and its large window opens up to the rear of the property to reveal a garden and pool.

Elizabeth II by Bates Masi Architects

“The research of sound and how it affects our perception of space informed the details, materials, and form of the project” say the architects. “This approach to the design led to a richer and more meaningful home for the family.” I think the finished house looks beautiful, and I’d happily except an invite to come stay-over from whoever its new residents are!

Elizabeth II by Bates Masi Architects

More work from Bates + Masi Architects can be seen on their website.

Philip Kennedy

August 27, 2014 / By

“Rideaux Lunaires,” A Magical Piano Track by Chilly Gonzales

Chilly Gonzales

I usually listen to music while I work, but I tend to put on albums with limited or no words, it’s easier to write that way. A lot of the time my go-to record is Solo Piano II by Chilly Gonzales. Released in 2012 the album is piano filled masterpiece that feels like an old silent film. There’s one track in particular though that stands out each time I hear and it’s called “Rideaux Lunaires”, the fifth track on the album.

There’s something magical about this piece that makes me think of the films of Miyazaki and the sense of wonder he achieves. At about the 1 minute mark there’s a beautiful refrain which makes you feel like you’re being carried away into the night sky.

If you’ve never heard this album before I highly suggest taking a listen, you definitely won’t be disappointed.

Bobby Solomon

August 27, 2014 / By

Maria Svarbova’s Photographs Reflect on God and the Human Form

Maria Svarbova

Illusion. Reflection. Vulnerability. These are the things I see when I look at God’s Mirror, a photo series by Maria Svarbova. The images are dreamy and surreal with nude figures floating amongst a dark and cloudy sky. Yet there’s something off with each of the figures. Look closely and you’ll see that each person has an extra limb or a reflect face which distorts the body. Maria claims the effect isn’t done in Photoshop so whatever technique she’s deployed here is quite impressive.

Of all the images my favorite has to be the one at top with the man and mirror. Love how surreal it looks. Almost looks like it could be a painting, not a photo.

Maria Svarbova

Maria Svarbova

Maria Svarbova

Maria Svarbova

Maria Svarbova

All of Maria’s photos are quite impressive, I suggest you take the time to go through all of her series on her Behance page.

Bobby Solomon

August 26, 2014 / By

Erik Spiekermann: “Being Obsessive About Detail Is Being Normal”

Erik Spiekermann

I have some very strong opinions about the very strong opinions of Erik Spiekermann. To me he comes off as a cranky old man most of the time but he certainly deserves credit for his long-standing work as a typographer and designer. Recently, he wrote on his blog about the importance of details and how he refuses to be “classified as weird and unusual” because of his obsession.

Every craft requires atten­tion to detail. Whether you’re build­ing a bicy­cle, an engine, a table, a song, a type­face or a page: the details are not the details, they make the design. Con­cepts don’t have to be pixel-perfect, and even the fussi­est project starts with a rough sketch. But build­ing some­thing that will be used by other peo­ple, be they dri­vers, rid­ers, read­ers, lis­ten­ers – users every­where, it needs to be built as well as can be. Unless you are obsessed by what you’re doing, you will not be doing it well enough.

I think Mr. Spiekermann really nails it with this statement. My design-focused brain can’t help but obsess over the details. The nuances of the object you’re designing is what gives it character. The importance of details holds true for things like objects, old or new. When you pick up an iPhone you see the subtle detailing that makes it feel special. Or with older objects you can experience the wabi-sabi of it, the wear and patina that gives it an exceptional quality.

Be sure to read Erik’s full post by clicking here.

Bobby Solomon

August 26, 2014 / By

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