Magical Fashion Photography by Oleg Oprisco

Oleg Oprisco

I can’t say that I know much about Oleg Oprisco other then that facts that he works in Kiev and that his photos blow my mind. To me his work seem like a really beautiful blend of fashion and conceptual photography. There’s an obvious beauty to each of them but there’s also a ton of work that went into each image to make it happen. Whether it’s an immense crown of flowers adorning a woman’s head or a woman lighting a box of oversized matches, each of these scenarios must have taken a lot of time and effort to create.

Oleg Oprisco

Oleg Oprisco

Oleg Oprisco

Oleg Oprisco

Oleg Oprisco

Oleg Oprisco

Oleg Oprisco

See more of Oleg’s incredible photos by clicking here.

Bobby Solomon

July 22, 2014 / By

Interview with Los Angeles Ceramacist and Designer Eric Roinestad

Eric Roinestad Ceramics

You know Eric Roinestad’s work but you might not know he was the man behind it. He’s worked at Capitol Records creating album covers and packaging for bands like The Beatles and Fiona Apple. Still, he had an itch to create things by hand again, eventually getting into ceramics. I came across his work at an exhibit he had at Mohawk General Store in Los Angeles. The show featured a number of beautiful desert inspired pieces that are some of the best I’ve seen in a long while. Thus I thought it would be interesting to ask Eric about his thoughts on his inspirations and future.

What spurred this collection? It makes me think of Palm Springs and the desert, which I love.
The desert and California landscape was the big inspiration on this collection of pieces; I’m glad that came across.

What’s your process for making the pieces? Do you sculpt all the pieces or are they cast?
Everything is either hand built, or thrown on the wheel with hand applied elements. The cans, however, are press molded. Most of what I do is pretty labor intensive, casting is very tempting but I would hate to lose the one of a kind quality my pieces have. I like seeing a creator’s hand in their work.

Eric Roinestad Ceramics

I’m a huge fan of ceramics and one day I’d love to start my own line. What started you down this path?
When I started out as a graphic designer computers were still new and I was doing most of my work by hand, pasting up layouts and hand drawing logos, I loved it. Then computers took over and I would sit in front of my screen all day, really missing working with my hands. Ceramics started out as an after work activity when I was at Capitol Records. A friend of mine and I would drive out to Monrovia Community Adult School for ceramics class one night a week, and it never stopped. About a year and a half ago I converted my studio space and devoted most of my time to ceramics; in November, Lawson Fenning asked to sell my stuff in their store.

Eric Roinestad Ceramics

Where are you drawing your inspirations from lately?
I’m always looking at nature for a lot of my inspiration. We have a large California native garden, so most of my inspiration is right outside my studio door. I’ve also been inspired by the shapes in Jean-Michel Frank’s work, as well as the bronze and plaster work that Diego and Alberto Giacometti did for him in the 1930′s. I’d love to interpret that 30′s French modernism in a California sort of way.

Eric Roinestad Ceramics

Anything coming up you’d like to talk about?
Since my show opened at Mohawk General Store some interesting new opportunities have appeared. I am excited about collaborations with other companies and designers. One project that I am eager to show are mirrors with ceramic tiles and tile tables I have been working on with a good friend, Christos Prevezanos, at Studio Preveza.

Eric Roinestad Ceramics

Bobby Solomon

July 21, 2014 / By

Artist Kyung-Woo Han Creates Rorschach Tests from Plastic Bags

Plastic Rorschach by Han Kyung Woo

Take a look at the image above and what do you see? A bat? A monster? A shopping bag? … Something else? Created by Korean artist Kyung-Woo Han, the artwork is a Rorschach test and like any Rorschach its meaning is open to interpretation.

Han is a graduate of both the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Maine, and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. There’s a playfulness to his work that really appeals to me and he often incorporates optical illusions within his multidisciplinary practice. For Han, the aim is always to create both a sense of wonder and bewilderment for his viewer.

Plastic Rorschach by Han Kyung Woo

The simplicity of this work is what I find most appealing. Boldly graphic, the images play with perception; forcing the viewer to question even further what they see in each picture. If you ask me, this series feels like René Magritte’s The Treachery of Images for a generation raised by consumerism. I love it!

Plastic Rorschach by Han Kyung Woo

See more optical work from Han on his website.

Philip Kennedy

July 21, 2014 / By

Eszter Laki Brings A Refined Design Identity to the Terminal Restaurant & Bar in Budapest

Terminal Restaurant & Bar Branding by Eszter Laki

Terminal Restaurant & Bar Branding by Eszter Laki

I love a good re-use project and the Terminal Restaurant & Bar is a prime example. Designed by István Nyir and built in 1949, The Mávaut Station was one of the largest and busiest bus stations in downtown Budapest. The simple, well-proportioned building was built for long-distance transport requirements with a spacious, bright waiting hall. Thankfully it was preserved as a monument in the 80s, and then in 2004 refurbished as the Design Terminal, the first design center of Budapest.

Terminal Restaurant & Bar Branding by Eszter Laki

The interiors design was conceived by the 81font architecture in a tight cooperation with the graphic identity. We were eager to preserve, recall and highlight the original features of the building. This attitude resulted in the emblematic logo, the minimalist copper clock which has served the building from the very beginning. This sign appears on the furnitures as well: the linoleum coatings wear the same clock as a copper marquetry. The iconic Hungarian Ikarus bus is a leading element in the graphic identity as well: the technical drawings of the famous vehicle are part of the menu card. We used a rubber stamp to indicate the subtle changes around the opening period and put a test drive caption (“Próbajárat”) on the paper cards.

The rich history of the space mixed with the subtle design elements is well-considered. The use of the copper clock as a mark was created by Eszter Laki, graphic designer on the project. The warm copper mixed with the whites and navy blues is an attractive, timeless combination. If you find yourself in Budapest be sure to stop by.

Terminal Restaurant & Bar Branding by Eszter Laki

Terminal Restaurant & Bar Branding by Eszter Laki

Terminal Restaurant & Bar Branding by Eszter Laki

Terminal Restaurant & Bar Branding by Eszter Laki

Bobby Solomon

July 21, 2014 / By

Oamul Lu’s Paintings Capture The Beautiful Details of Every Day Life

Oamul Lu

Oamul Lu

I first came across the work of Chinese artist Oamul Lu last summer, writing about these alluring animated GIFs he was making. Recently he took a trip to Australia with some friends and painted some of the experiences he had. Not all of the images are from that trip, but I’m such a fan of his work I wanted to put them all on here.

Oamul Lu

When I look at his pieces they all feel romantic. There’s an idyllic wonder to each, like he’s able to capture a perfect moment in time. I’m also a fan of his color choices and all the greens and oranges that he uses. You can’t help but feel happy when you look at his work.

You should follow him on Tumblr by clicking here.

Oamul Lu

Oamul Lu

Oamul Lu

Oamul Lu

Oamul Lu

Bobby Solomon

July 18, 2014 / By

Ken Hermann’s ‘Flower Man’ Photo Series

Ken Hermann's 'Flower Man' Photo Series

Copenhagen based photographer Ken Hermann recently completed a photo series titled Flower Man that showcases the merchants from the Mallick Ghat flower market. I love these portraits because they’re able to capture the range of people that sell at the market, much like the numerous blossoms sold there. I think the technique of fading out the background to bring the subject more into focus is a nice touch as well.

Check out the whole series of photos by clicking here.

Ken Hermann's 'Flower Man' Photo Series

Ken Hermann's 'Flower Man' Photo Series

Bobby Solomon

July 18, 2014 / By

Shigeto Brings An Extended Remix of “What’s Left” by Trees

If you’re like me and late at night is your time for getting shit done you might like this. A few months back Shigeto did this great extended remix of the track “What’s Left” by Trees, bringing his signature sound to the track. It’s got a great, mellow vibe that doesn’t distract from what you’re doing. And at 9 minutes long you’re definitely not going to get bored of it. I’ve been playing it over and over all night.

Trees - Rootwork

Bobby Solomon

July 17, 2014 / By

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