3 Rules For A Happy Designer by Gradiate

3 Rules For A Happy Designer

It’s important to keep a sense of perspective in your work and your life, and Gradiate’s 3 Rules For A Happy Designer are a few strong points we should all keep mind. For me, it’s his first point that really nails it.

1. It’s all bollocks and none of it really matters. Yes really. That stress about the thing that went really wrong, your burning desire to make this your best design ever that in turn makes you miserable, the argument about the late print, graphic design, none of this is what really really matters in life. Release yourself from that stress. No one is dying. It’s pixels, type and colour. Work hard, but enjoy it and relax.

You can read the other two points by clicking here.

Bobby Solomon

October 28, 2014 / By

Kustaa Saksi’s Bold, Colorful SS15 Collection for Marimekko

Kustaa Saksi for Marimekko SS15

I’ve been a long time fan of Finnish artist Kustaa Saksi and his organic-feeling, nature inspired work. It’s been fascinating to see the evolution he’s taken over the years, though his most recent work may just be some of my very favorite – a collaboration with the legendary Marimekko.

Finnish artist Kustaa Saksi makes his Marimekko debut in the collection with the fascinating Merivuokko (sea anemone) and Meriheinä (sea grass) prints that are seen as fabric, home textiles and tableware. The prints were inspired by the rhythm, colours and atmosphere of the sea floor that he has experienced during his scuba diving trips. The Merivuokko pattern depicts the depth and abstract, clear forms of the sea and details of its flora and fauna. The free, swaying vegetation of the sea floor and its organized chaos, on the other hand, gave rise to the light, ethereal and moving Meriheinä print.

I love the range that his work has hit, going from homewares to fashion. It shows the versatility of his creativity and how these unique patterns can be used for some many fascinating applications. I don’t think the collection is out quite yet, so the trick is figuring out how to get one of those pillows below…

Kustaa Saksi for Marimekko SS15

Kustaa Saksi for Marimekko SS15

Kustaa Saksi for Marimekko SS15

Kustaa Saksi for Marimekko SS15

Bobby Solomon

October 28, 2014 / By

Chuck Taylor 1970 HI ‘Woven Textile’ Sneakers

Chuck Taylor 1970 HI 'Woven Textile' Sneakers

I’m a big fan of high tops, but I’ve never been a Chuck Taylor kind of guy. There’s nothing wrong with a good pair of Chuck’s, they’re probably the most iconic American shoe around, they simply haven’t been my style. That said, there’s an exception to every rule, and these new 1970 HI ‘Woven Textile’ sneakers caught my attention immediately.

Chuck Taylor 1970 HI 'Woven Textile' Sneakers

I love the loose knit, multi-colored, chunky yarn that envelopes the shoe. It’s an effect that could really go wrong or look quite tacky. It was smart for the designers to go with more muted yarns and only blending in a subtle bit of color, which pairs quite well with the vegetable tanned leather, creating an overall sophisticated, bohemian touch.

Chuck Taylor 1970 HI 'Woven Textile' Sneakers

They’re not for everyone, and that’s why they’re so great. You can grab a pair for yourself (they’re unisex!) over on Bows & Arrows.

Bobby Solomon

October 28, 2014 / By

Matthew Feyld’s Paintings Prove That Colors and Shapes Are Sometimes All You Need

Matthew Feyld

Last week Bobby posted some truly fantastic looping illustrations from the American designer and illustrator Drew Tryndall. I loved them, and they’re bright colors and simple shapes kind of reminded me of this great work by the Canadian artist Matthew Feyld.

Made up of strong blocks of color and bold but beautiful shapes, there’s a naive simplicity to Feyld’s paintings which just works. Whether viewed on their own or viewed as a set, there’s something so perfectly direct about these paintings that I can’t help but love them.

Matthew Feyld

Matthew Feyld

In an interview with Little Paper Planes, Feyld discussed the inspiration behind the shapes and forms he uses in his work:

Some of them started as human figures, or day to day objects that over time have been stripped down and become less and less figurative. Others have come from excessive doodling. I’m interested in the relationships between shapes. And the spaces that those shapes inhabit. And the even smaller spaces between those shapes.

If you’re a fan of nice shapes, then I fully recommend you check out more work from Feyld.

Matthew Feyld

Matthew Feyld

You can view more work from Matthew Feyld on his website.

Philip Kennedy

October 27, 2014 / By

Create Realistic Mixed-Media Waterscapes with a Free Guide from Craftsy (Sponsored)

Create Realistic Mixed-Media Waterscapes with a Free Guide from Craftsy (Sponsored)

Have you dreamed about capturing the ocean’s beauty on canvas? Discover foolproof techniques for drawing and painting crashing waves, picturesque ponds and much more with Craftsy’s free, exclusive guide: Secrets to Creating Realistic Waterscapes in Mixed Media.

Gain all the essential skills for success when you take advantage of instant access to 21 pages packed with step-by-step mixed media tutorials, tips, and tricks, from artist Antonella Avogadro. From drawing flowing water to realistic water drops, learn everything you need to know.

Download the free guide at Craftsy.com.

Bobby Solomon

October 27, 2014 / By

Sophisticated Branding for Fort Point Beer Company by Manual

Fort Point Beer Company Branding by Manual

Crafting unique, standout labels for a new beer seems like an awesome challenge. Making sure that the brew stands out in a competitive market can be difficult as well as creating a look that feels unique and original. Manual, the SF based design firm, has struck gold with this sophisticated look for the Fort Point Beer Company, a craft brewery located in San Francisco’s Presidio.

The brewery resides in a historic Presidio building that was formerly used as an Army motor pool. Their iconic location—close to both the Golden Gate Bridge and the Fort Point National Historic Site—provided inspiration for a modular, illustrative brand identity. The result is a brand that locals can identify with and, as the brand grows and becomes available throughout the nation, can be regarded as the new San Francisco craft beer.

Fort Point Beer Company Branding by Manual

I’m a sucker for gold these days (my team will back this up) and the black, white, and tomato red color combinations really make me happy. The geometric patterns have a playful nature which remind me of the work of Mary Blair, and at the same time honors a San Francisco landmark.

Fort Point Beer Company

The choice of a Copperplate Gothic-esque font pairs well with the bold, geometric lines that make up the label. It has a feeling of being both contemporary yet classic, bringing to mind the early days of San Francisco. The overall branding is extremely charming and inviting, and when you see the bottle it certainly looks like something new that you want to try.

You can see more images from the project by clicking here.

Fort Point Beer Company Branding by Manual

Fort Point Beer Company Branding by Manual

Fort Point Beer Company Branding by Manual

Bobby Solomon

October 27, 2014 / By

David Chang: “I Hate Fancy Beers”

Miller High Life Print by Alan Hynes

As I write this I’m sipping on a Miller High Life, are is it’s been dubbed, the “Champagne of Beers”. I acquired a taste for it back in 2010/2011 when I was attempting to freelance during a recession. At the corner liquor store near my apartment was 40s of High Life which only cost in the ballpark of $2.50. So long as you kept the 40 oz. cool it was actually a pretty damn good beer. Even Bon Appétit agrees.

Which brings me to my point, this recent article by David Chang for GQ espousing his love for cheap beer. As he says in the article, which I also agree with, rare, obnoxious, snooty beers are great, this is not the reason for his piece. His argument centers around the area that he cares about most: that cheap beers pairs well with food. Here’s the paragraph where he knocks it out of the park.

For all the debatability of my rant here, let me make one ironclad argument for shitty beer: It pairs really well with food. All food. Think about how well champagne pairs with almost anything. Champagne is not a flavor bomb! It’s bubbly and has a little hint of acid and tannin and is cool and crisp and refreshing. Cheap beer is, no joke, the champagne of beers. And cheap beer and spicy food go together like nothing else. Think about Natty Boh and Old Bay-smothered crabs. Or Asian lagers like Orion and Singha and Tiger, which are all perfect ways to wash down your mapo tofu.

Couldn’t agree more. Also, as I tend to find random things when I research posts, I found the really sweet Miller High Life print by Alan Hynes (at top) which you might want to snag. Only $40.

Bobby Solomon

October 27, 2014 / By

Everyday Surrealism: Chuck Anderson’s Skillshare Class About Creating Art from Photos

Everyday Surrealism: Chuck Anderson's Skillshare Class About Creating Art from Photos

Chuck Anderson

Lately I’ve been really impressed with the creative photography that Chuck Anderson has been posting to his Instagram lately. The aesthetic blends surrealism and blown out lights and colors which make for a visual feast. Now he’s offering a course on how to do similar things with your own photos in this Skillshare class titled Everyday Surrealism: Creating Art from Photos.

Artist Chuck Anderson is known for his surreal, colorful aesthetic and the way he merges photography, design, and art. In this 45-minute class, join Chuck as he photographs 3 scenes—architecture, a still-life, and a landscape—and then transforms each into a collaged work of art using (amazingly) a single mobile app.

Throughout the class, Chuck shares his vision so that you understand the philosophy behind every technique. You’ll refine your eye as a designer, sensibility as a photographer, and imagination as an artist. Whether you want more experimental images for an upcoming exhibit, album cover, show poster, wall print, or even your Instagram feed, this class is the perfect combination of vision, technique, and real creativity.

Bobby Solomon

October 24, 2014 / By

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