Flowers in China

I found this video while searching for educational videos of carnivorous plants. The fact that I can’t read anything in the video (other than the 7) doesn’t bother me because I can still understand that it’s promoting a flower show with all kinds of big flowers, small flowers, desert flowers, and so on. No, the video isn’t particularly¬†elegant, but compared to the some of the commercials around these parts, I’d take “7th China Flower Expo” any day of the week. And even without a trashy american cousin, this video is still enjoyable.

Alex Dent

April 15, 2010 / By

‘Ritual’ by Jeana Sohn

I’m sure that many readers will already be familiar with the work of LA-based artist Jeana Sohn. From her photograph series for the fourth volume of Lines & Shapes to her delicately illustrated egg sculptures to the fairy-tale landscapes of her paintings, Sohn infuses everything she creates with a haunting and dreamy quality. She has recently extended her artistic skills by using her Canon 7D to create short films and has been posting the results on her blog. In “Ritual”, her second attempt at filming, Sohn continues her thematic interest in nature and the manner in which people engage with their surroundings.

“Ritual” has a simple, organic and lo-fi quality that I really like. Using an instrumental piece of music from Jonathan Glazer’s film Birth, Sohn’s short film conjures a private space of wistful longing. Significantly, she has not tried to produce a strong narrative trajectory and has instead focused on making a work that captures feelings and sensations. Considering that Sohn has only recently started using moving picture as a form of artistic expression, I am really impressed by her stunning imagery, clever editing and seamless interplay between sound and visual.

I can only hope that she will continue her little cinematic wanders through nature.

April 15, 2010 / By

The Desktop Wallpaper Project featuring Laszlito Kovacs

Laszlito Kovacs

This week’s desktop wallpaper comes from a fella’ named Laszlito Kovacs, but you can call him Laszlo. Laszlo is a Dutch Spanish artist who’s an amazing illustrator who’s got such a great sense of shape and color. Currently he’s making some really rad posters like this one here which you can actually win by just filling out a survey. He’s also got some fun collaborations going on with Poolga as well, though I don’t think I’m allowed to talk about it!

For his desktop wallpaper he’s used the name of the blog and transformed it into this rad little typographic fox. It’s got a wonderful retro feel to it and I think the typography he created is absolutely spot on as well. Don’t forget to check out the iPhone version which is slightly different as well as the iPad wallpaper. Thanks again Laszlo!

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

April 14, 2010 / By

Lotta Nieminen







I don’t remember where I came across Lotta Nieminen’s work, but as soon as I saw her illustrations I knew I was gonna post about her. In fact, Lotta is getting quite a lot of attention lately as she was chosen as one of Print magazine’s 20 Under 30 which features the best and brightest under the age of 30. She’s a graduate of the University of Art and Design Helsinki and RISD and she’s quite a talented designer as well as an illustrator.

But really it’s her illustrations that got me. Her drawings seem so precise and are filled with slightly offbeat colors and lots of great texture. She’s kind of a blend between Sanna Annukka and Raymond Biesinger, which to me is a huge compliment. I’d love to see more of her illustrations all over the place, maybe even a desktop wallpaper?

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

April 14, 2010 / By

Austin Kleon

Austin Kleon is “a writer who draws” and creates poems by redacting text from newspaper articles. I first saw his prints through 20×200, and he has a book that was released yesterday. It’s hard to look past his work as a response to the proliferation of conspiracy theories, but can you imagine how he constructs these things? This question calls to mind¬†Tristan Tzara more than any truth commission. Tristian Tzara was a Dadaist poet with a novel approach to making poetry: cut up magazine articles and shake them around in a bag. Of course, these poems made no sense because Tzara didn’t want them to; they were just fragments of text randomly drawn out of a bag. But Kleon isn’t a Dadaist and he meticulously draws meaning out of existing newspaper articles on purpose. Sometimes Kleon’s poems appear effortless, but other poems demonstrate his working within the parameters of existing text. The above poem Time-Traveling has an unexpected ending that causes this kind of slippage in the reader’s mind (which is to say I can’t decide for sure if he built the poem around the ending or if the ending was a happy accident.) But the ending can’t be an accident because accidents don’t happen. At least not according to conspiracy theorists.

People who are convinced that Steve Jobs is taking over the world will be amused to learn that Austin Kleon went to walk his dog on April 3rd and came home with an iPad. He even demonstrates how to use the iPad and make a blackout poem. But who takes their dog for a walk to Best Buy?

Alex Dent

April 14, 2010 / By

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