Elyse Ricci





My buddy Robert over at Nerdski found out that a young lady named Elysse Ricci is behind a lot of Urban Outfitters’ current branding, something that I’ve definitely noticed in the past year or so. The branding is pretty simple, mostly type driven pieces with muted colors and subtle textures.

I think Urban is one of those brands that has it right by not really having a set brand, they’re just kind of eclectic. I can’t think of a lot of other brands that really embody this as well as UO does and it works really well for them. I think Elyse is doing an amazing job of keeping the branding quite open and flexible.

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

February 2, 2010 / By

#musicmonday

I don’t really feel like going over everything today, so let’s talk about the exciting stuff. First up is the Los Angeles band Local Natives, which honestly sound like something in between Ra Ra Riot and Fleet Foxes. If you like either or both of those bands I highly suggest you checking out these guys.

After that are two Japanese gentleman by the names of Takagi Masakatsu and Teruyuki Nobuchika. For some reason I’ve been on this minimalist, Japanese music kick lately and these guys definitely hit the mark. I’ve been listening to Masakatsu-sans pia and eating and Nobuchika-sans morceau.

What are you listening to lately?
Anything new or old that fit in with these folks?
Leave me some suggestions in the comments.

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

February 1, 2010 / By

The 2009 Annual Feltron Report





Last week Nicholas Felton, master of all things diagrammed, released his newest Feltron Annual Report for 2009 which outlines all of the activities he participated in last year. This year though he decided to change things up a bit and asked people he met to log their encounters through an online survey he set up.

In an interview with Mike Arauz, Mr. Felton speaks about the benefits of opening up his data collection to social input:

There have always been questions about my behavior that I have felt unqualified to track. My mood is one of those qualitative traits that I would rather not judge for myself, and the reporting system I devised provided a less biased way of recording it. Overall I was interested in how others see me, and what is memorable about an encounter with me. Ultimately, we all have our own self-image, but your public persona is how other people see you, and what they remember and tell others. This was what I hoped to record, evaluate and communicate. Of course, it has it’s limitations. I didn’t find that anyone recorded their dissatisfaction. I presume that if we had a negative encounter, that person was not interested in telling me my faults.

I’d suggest reading the rest of the interview as well, it’s a great look into a very talented guys head. You can also pre-order a letter pressed version of Mr. Feltron’s report for $20 by clicking here.
Yet again he knocks it out of the park.

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

February 1, 2010 / By

You Will Take A Chance At Something In The Near Future

The fortune above is just slightly nebulous (and the illustration is even mildly racist) but I found it last week while cleaning and it couldn’t have been more foretelling. Starting today I’ll be working on a giant new project that I don’t exactly want to name yet, but I will in the coming… well, sometime in the future.

The project itself probably couldn’t be a bigger challenge, which is exactly why I said yes. As a lover of all things design this could either be my greatest success or my biggest failure, though I’m confident it will be the former. But that’s sort of the fun of it, you know? I really don’t have any fear of failing or succeeding either way, because no matter what happens I’ll learn from my experiences.

I have my Mother to thank for this outlook. She raised me with a boat load of self-confidence, which is probably why people love to call me an “elitist” in comments. But I feel that my confidence is one of my biggest strengths, that I’m not afraid to speak my mind and that there’s nothing to fear in the idea of failing. As human beings we all fail, and failure is what gives us character. How we deal with these failures though is what shapes our character and who we are as people.

How do you deal with failure? Do you wallow in self-pity, dwelling on your failures? Or do you take an honest look at what you did wrong and learn from those mistakes? There’s no sense in dwelling on the past while you could be spending the time planning your future. Success rises from the ashes of failure.

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

February 1, 2010 / By

Jónsi Live on WNYC

One album that I’m super stoked about this year is Jónsi’s new album Go, which should be released on April 6 here in the States. I know a lot of you really loved the first sample we heard, the song Boy Lilikoi, but now there are a few more tracks to check out.

A couple weeks back Jónsi visited WNYC and had a little interview and played a few songs off of Go. It’s amazing to hear him perform because even though it’s just him and a ukelele (with three strings) his songs sound epic. He plays three songs live, one called Go Do and another called Around Us and Boy Lilikoi, and then we get to hear an album version of a song called Animal Arithmetic. I hope this brightens up your Monday some.

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

February 1, 2010 / By

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