Todd Richardson





I think a lot of people these days simply pick up a camera and start documenting their lives. It’s an easy thing to do, especially with digital cameras getting nicer and cheaper. But that doesn’t mean you can take a good picture. You need an artistic eye for that, similar to what Todd Richardson has.

Going through his photos you see photos of rather mundane things; walls, tires, gardens, perhaps a windowsill. But there’s something about the way that he photographs the mundane that really makes it seem quite special. He also does a great job of combining photos of one place to give you a sense of it. For example, the photos above were all taken in San Deigo, CA. They all have a similar feeling and color palette and I just want to stare at them and get as much information out of them as I possibly can.

Be sure to visit his site so you can see more examples of this. He’s been to places like Chicago, New York, London, Washington DC, Rome, Florence, Venice… you get the idea.

Update: Patrick asked in the comments asked how Todd processed his photos, so I asked him and here is his response. I figure you might like a little behind-the-scenes information:

I do all of my post-processing in Photoshop. I try to apply the same treatment – or variations thereof – to all of my photos. Some of these treatments originated from a Photoshop action I came across a while back. Over time, and from much trial and error, I was able to develop a post-processing regimen that provides the effect I’ve always wanted for my work – a kind of warm, vintage Polaroid look. I like soft tones and low saturation – nothing too loud.

Specifically, my post-processing routine consists of adding a fill layer (magenta), sepia de-saturation, and a vignette affect (depending on the photograph). Saturation and contrast are also adjusted. This is all pretty standard in digital manipulation. You might notice that a few of my photographs look slightly washed-out in the center; this effect is achieved through a center fill light.

I apply the same treatment to all of my work for consistency. I want my work to have a particular aesthetic. I find it distracting when a photographer employs several dissimilar effects across their portfolio, and distraction can sabotage some really great work. Ultimately, a photograph is only as good as its composition. I want the compositions to be the focus.

Thanks for filling us in Todd!

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

January 13, 2010 / By

Linefeed Reading List 1209/0110

When I first started this blog I was desperately looking for a WordPress theme that I liked, which if you’ve ever tried to parse through WordPress themes it’s a bit crappy. But I was able to come across a blog by a fellow named Michael Bojkowski who had a theme that was simple and everything I wanted. Well, I still use that theme to this day, though it’s been tweaked to the nth degree, but I owe Michael for helping me out.

Anyhow, he now runs a blog called Linefeed which is filled with all kinds of interesting design and ideas. Every time I visit I’m always amazed by all the new stuff he has up, it’s like he finds things from a different universe, it’s amazing. One thing he does consistently is his Reading List, which is his review of magazines from the month. The one above is a mixture of December and January, but he presents some interesting magazines you might not know about and some insightful commentary on ones you do.

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

January 13, 2010 / By

‘Absolute Ronin’





Two of my biggest are design (obviously) and comic books. Sadly though, these two worlds hardly ever mix unless Chip Kidd is involved. So it was nice to see DC redesigning a new version of Frank Miller’s classic Ronin into a huge, deluxe version they’re calling Absolute Ronin. This new Absolute version was designed by Amelia Grohman who I think did a wonderful job. She was really able to capture the spirit of the book by blowing up a lot of the images from key scenes in the book, giving you an intimate look at the wonderfully detailed line work of Frank Miller.

I actually had my boyfriend read this last month because he wanted something “fun and action-y” and I thought this fit the bill. If you’ve never heard of it before, I’ll paste this long but accurate description of the book for you:

“The story involves a feudal Japanese samurai whose master has been slain (a ronin), a magical sword, and a shape-shifting demon who intersect with an apocalyptic future New York City wherein neo-Nazis, Black Panthers and the occasional sixties survivor drift around in toxic squalor, making tribal war with one another in the shadow of an ├╝ber high-tech research facility where a limbless, telekinetic man-child with unknown powers is being held in the care of a sentient biological computer (which seems to have its own agenda) and the computer’s creators, including the beautiful female Chief of Security, struggle to contain and negotiate the use of their diabolical biotechnology.”

I’d highly suggest grabbing this book if you’re looking for a comic book with a bit of depth, great artwork and a lot of fun. Tachi.

Found through Faceout Books

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

January 13, 2010 / By

Jeffrey Deitch Becomes Gallery Director of MoCA

There are few gallery directors that I could name off of the top of my head, and the three I can think of don’t work at museums, they were at small independent galleries. Jeffrey Deitch is one of them with his now famous gallery Deitch Projects. His gallery was started back in 1996 and since then has featured works by artists such as Barry McGee, Steve Powers, Os Gemeos, Swoon and Ryan Mcginnes. These artists were once considered to be “low brow” but Jeffrey Deitch showed them for the true geniuses they are and helped launch their more mainstream careers.

But times change and now he’s decided to switch coasts and become the gallery director of the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art. This presents some very exciting opportunities for Los Angeles, which really excites me. Unfortunately it also means that he will no longer have anything to do with Dietch Projects. From what I read it’s a conflict of interest for him to run an art gallery that makes money while working for a donor based gallery. Nonetheless I’m extremely excited to see what he does with the MoCA. I can’t say that I’ve ever been to an exciting show there, so hopefully he revitalizes the museum and brings in some really interesting artists, like the ones I mentioned above.

My last, and most important point, though, is suck it New York, haha…

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

January 12, 2010 / By

Kevin Cooley





I’m a sucker for a certain kind of photography. I like long exposures, saturated colors and foreign locations and the photos of Kevin Cooley definitely fit all three criteria. Kevin calls Brooklyn his home base but he takes beautiful photos from all over the world. He has this amazing way of catching light streaks from airplanes and fireworks that seem to light up the night sky like I’ve never seen before. Definitely be sure to check out his Iceland and Svalbard sets, they were two of my favorites.

Found through Ben Pieratt

Bobby

Bobby Solomon

January 12, 2010 / By

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